Thin Lizzy - Black Rose: A Rock Legend (Vinyl)

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Thin Lizzy were a brilliant rock band formed in Dublin, Ireland, in 1969. Two of the founding members, drummer Brian Downey and bass guitarist and lead vocalist Phil Lynott, met while still in school. Lynott led the group throughout their recording career of twelve studio albums, writing most of the material. The singles “Whiskey In The Jar” (a traditional Irish ballad) & “The Boys Are Back In Town” were international hits. After Lynott's death in 1986, various incarnations of the band emerged over the years based initially around guitarists Scott Gorham and John Sykes, though Sykes left the band in 2009. Gorham later continued with a new line-up including Downey. Lynott, Thin Lizzy's de facto leader, was composer or co-composer of almost all of the band's songs, and the first black Irishman to achieve commercial success in the field of rock music (or to play at Wembley!)

"Black Rose: A Rock Legend" is their ninth studio album. Released in 1979, it has been described as one of the band's "greatest, most successful albums".
The album peaked at No. 2 in the UK charts. It was the first time that blues rock guitarist Gary Moore remained in Thin Lizzy long enough to record an album after previous brief stints in 1974 and 1977 with the band.
The album included the second song Phil Lynott wrote about a member of his family titled “Sarah”, the first song by this name having appeared on 1972's Shades of a Blue Orphanage, written about his grandmother, also named Sarah. The song on Black Rose is about his then new-born daughter.
The last track, "Róisín Dubh", consists of traditional songs, all arranged by Lynott and Moore, as well as many original parts. The song “Will Yo Go Lassie, Go” (also known as "Wild Mountain Thyme") is sometimes mistakenly credited as a traditional song, but was in fact written by William McPeake, and first recorded by Francis McPeake (and is credited on the album to "F. McPeak").
Black Rose has been described the album as "Thin Lizzy's last true classic album", and their "most musically varied, accomplished, and successful studio album".

 



It’s a heavier approach we find Ireland’s finest (sorry, U2) rock band swathed in on this effort, having since dispatched guitarist Brian Robertson (injured in a bar fight, he’d later gone to rattle cages briefly with Motorhead) in favor of Gary Moore. The man’s speed, weight and general all around breathtaking guitar abilities could never be anything but a boon to any band, and this wasn’t the first time Phil Lynott and company had called on him to pinch hit. He’d stepped into the breach on the Bad Reputation tour, and here he is as a full-blown member of the Lizzy lineup proper.

Material wise, it’s another straight shooting collection of material that continues the band’s ever upward spiraling legacy, although fewer and fewer dollars were forthcoming despite the overflowing art on display. A much thicker guitar tone than previous is immediately evident on “Do Anything You Want To,” a rumbling, bass driven number that’s fun, but a shade formulaic by Lizzy’s usually mould-busting standards. The real heat arrives with “Toughest Street In Town,” a tale of rough stuff in the city, fueled by Lynott’s visceral visions, and Moore’s relentless shredding. “Waiting For An Alibi” is a great twin-guitar motivated number; featuring some of the band’s most impressive six string layering ever. “My Sarah” is a lovely tune Lynott wrote for his young daughter, which is hardly appropriate for snarling rock, so Lizzy appropriately perform this one at half-mast, with melodious solos aplenty.

By this time it must be admitted that the man (Lynott) and the band’s drug addiction was on the brink of seriously addling their collective futures. Thus, the frankness with which said addiction is confronted in “Got To Give It Up” is startling, and would be downright morose, if not for boasting some of the band’s toughest riffs ever. It’s clear that whereas most rock stars saw drug ‘n booze excess as their right, Lynott saw it for what it was; a yoke he was sadly not able to walk away from, right up until his death. The far punchier and terse “Get Out Of Here” is a humorous detour, and a real relief, while “Roisin Dubh (Black Rose)” is metal greatness galore. Lyrically recalling “Emerald” from the band’s own Jailbreak, it’s another journey into Lynott’s learned Gaelic mind, and boasts some staggering incendiary guitar work from both Moore and longtime Lizzy accomplice Scott Gorham.

And so the Lizzy rampage rolls on, bloodied, intoxicated and still in search of a sizable audience. From here, there would be two more albums (Chinatown and Renegade) of varying quality and varying lineups (Moore would split, not being able to handle the heroin, whilst Snowy White and Midge Ure would have brief and odd tenures with the band).

By: cirithungol


A1 Do Anything You Want To
A2 Toughest Street In Town
A3 S & M
A4 Waiting For An Alibi
A5 Sarah
B1 Got To Give It Up
B2 Get Out Of Here
B3 With Love
Roisin Dubh (Black Rose) A Rock Legend
B4a Shenandoah
B4b Will You Go Lassy Go
B4c Danny Boy
B4d The Mason's Apron



Issued with a printed inner sleeve with pictures and credits. Including a voucher to download MP3 version of the album.

Recorded and mixed at Pathe Marconi EMI Studios, Paris, France and Good Earth Studio, London, England

Published by:
Chappell/PINT (tracks A1, A4 & A5)
Chappell/PINT Cop. Con. (tracks B1, B4a, B4c and B4d)
Chappell/PUK (tracks A2, A3, B3)
EFDS Pubs. (track B4b)

© 1979 Phonogram Ltd.
This compilation ℗ 2014 Mercury Records Limited. © 2014 Mercury Records Limited
Made in EU.